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O I L - Everything you ever needed to know about it

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I was sent this blog this morning and I can not stop reading it. It contains very FACTUAL data relating to OIL and everything you need to know about oil.

With that this guy performs tests on various oils to provide the best data possible. Its a very long read, but well worth it, and I already feel much smarter. 

https://540ratblog.wordpress.com/

Image result for Oils

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3 hours ago, B C said:

But, Bob is the oil guy though.

Im here to say that 540 Rat might be named Bob behind that user name?

Seriously though, this guy is the real deal. Looks like ZDDP is a gimmick. FML

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I'm sorry, I cant get past the first few paragraphs.

When I see  "I" 25 times in the first 5 paragraphs and someone spewing their credential like a laundry list. I see arrogance and no credibility.

Report your data and let it speak for itself.

And touting chlorinated paraffin additives to prop up compression wear values.  Great your getting higher numbers because the additive is creating a hard oxide layer on the metal surface

Your rusting the insides of the engine. Let alone what it does to all the seals.

Today's Motor Oil is a complicated blend of chemicals that cant be rated by one mechanical failure test.

I believe the guys name is Richard, and he goes by Rick, but he's more of a ....

 

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I have to agree with @RobZR here. This reads more like a rant than a well thought out presentation of research data. The results are very one-dimensional. Sure they're FACTS, but oil is a complicated subject, and assuming that one-dimension trumps all other factors seems too simplistic. Not my wheelhouse, so I guess I can't say much beyond that.

Edit: I guess my biggest question here is how do these pressure tests affect wear in an engine? If the oil can withstand more pressure than would ever be applied to the interface, then the metal parts would never touch, and therefore never wear. I would assume that wear in an engine is mostly caused from contaminants getting into the oil.

Another edit: "I’ve also “wear tested” a number of oils, both synthetic and conventional, when they were used with 5,000 miles on them. And in every case, even though those oils had been subjected to heat and stress over a significant length of time, there was NO REDUCTION what so ever, in wear protection capability"

^ So this means I never have to change my oil? "NO REDUCTION what so ever, in wear protection capability"!

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10 hours ago, HipMF said:

I have to agree with @RobZR here. This reads more like a rant than a well thought out presentation of research data. The results are very one-dimensional. Sure they're FACTS, but oil is a complicated subject, and assuming that one-dimension trumps all other factors seems too simplistic. Not my wheelhouse, so I guess I can't say much beyond that.

Edit: I guess my biggest question here is how do these pressure tests affect wear in an engine? If the oil can withstand more pressure than would ever be applied to the interface, then the metal parts would never touch, and therefore never wear. I would assume that wear in an engine is mostly caused from contaminants getting into the oil. 

 

I agree, all of these DIY oil tests use the pressure method because all you need is a bearing rub test machine which is very simple.  Just run something of decent quality you will be just fine.  I run Royal Purple HPS which is about 8/qt but I don't go around telling everyone they should.  For me to run that for 10k miles saves me time and money over using something else and changing it sooner.  I couldn't get an engineer friend of mine to understand that running cheap conventional for 3/qt and changing it every 3k was actually more expensive than my "crazy magic oil".  It actually cost him more money not to mention changing oil several times a year instead of once or twice depending how the 10k interval lands.  Also no need for stickers to remind me, change at 140k, 150k, 160k etc.

I do plan to do a Blackstone labs test but my observation is on the M50 that i rebuilt I opened it to swap in a different cam with about 50k since the rebuild and it looked spotless.  In fact the casting was still gray with no brownish tint at all.

This isn't the best picture but the brown cam is the M54B30 cam that was just installed.

m7FYCh6.jpg

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Im not saying everything this guy says is right, but Im also not saying he's wrong.

Basically I saw that he has a lot of useful information posted about oils that may or may not be helpful to some.

I personally will continue to use shit oil in shit cars and nice stuff in the ones I care about. I think I have posted pictures of the inside of my civics engine before and the head looks like it has 10k on it. no browning tint on the metals, bright and clean aluminum casting, and no wear marks at all. It has 310k on it as of today. For the most part,  unless you are running a crazy built motor, basic off the shelf oil is better than any oil designed and formulated 20 years ago.

 

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